Once in a Blue Agave Moon: The Spirit World (out-of sequence; chapter tbd)

 

The aboriginal name of the Aztec people of Mexico was the Nahuatl.

The Agave is a succulent, often referred to as the Maguey, that belongs to a botanical genus of its own, the agavaceae, which is not a cactus but is in fact more closely related to the lily.

The legend surrounding the origin of the Agave is rich in romance and adventure, although somewhat varied, depending upon the source.

Mayahuel, the goddess of fertility, was being held hostage by her grand-mother, Tzintzimitl, an evil goddess who devoured light and kept the people of the earth in darkness, requiring human sacrifices in order to get even the most meager amount of light.

Quetzalcoatl, the “Feathered Serpent,” was the the god of redemption and giver of life.

He felt compassion for the people of earth, and believed in honor, so he ascended to the sky to fight the evil goddess Tzintzimitl to set them free of her cruel treatment of them.

Instead of finding Tzintzimitl, he met Mayahuel, and instantly fell in love with her.

Quetzalcoatl, unable to find and kill Tzintzimitl, decided to rescue Mayahuel and brought her back to earth to live with him.

Upon learning this, Tzintzimitl flew into a rage and went to earth to look for them. No matter where they went, they only stayed barely out of her reach, and growing weary of constantly running from her, decided to disguise themselves as two plants growing so close that when the wind blew, their branches rubbed together.

Tzintzimitl sent demons to scour the earth to look everywhere for them, and eventually, when she discovered their disguise, chopped Mayahuel into tiny pieces, killing her.

Quetzalcoatl, devastated by the loss of Mayahuel, killed Tzintzimitl. Unable to restore the life of his lover, he gathered the pieces and buried her in a special place, where he wept day and night for a very long time, until the Agave grew from her body, nurtured by his tears.

The gods felt pity for Quetzalcoatl, and imparted special powers to the Agave to ease the suffering he felt for his lost love.

By drinking the fermented sap, which was called Pulque, Quetzalcoatl’s broken heart was soothed.

That is what the Nahuatl believed to be the origin of the Agave and how it was given its magical properties to comfort the souls of those who have lost someone dear to their hearts.

 

Namasté

नमस्ते

Chazz Vincent

07/22/2017

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: